Humane Pennsylvania provides no animal control services.

If you require assistance with a found stray animal, please contact your municipality to determine who performs animal control in your area. Below is an outline of the surrender process and associated fees for stray animals.

Humane League of Lancaster County

  • An appointment must be made with the Humane League of Lancaster County in order to surrender a stray animal.
  • There is no fee to bring in a stray animal from Lancaster County to the Humane League of Lancaster County. However, we suggest a donation of $25 at the time of drop off to help offset the cost of care for each animal.

Suggested Litter Fees:

  • Bottle Baby Kittens: $25 fee per litter
  • Mom Cat and Nursing Kittens: $50 fee
  • Litter of Weaned Kittens: $25 fee

Humane Society of Berks County

  • A $50 fee will be applied to any stray animal brought to the Humane Society of Berks County.

Required Litter Fees:

  • Bottle Baby Kittens: $25 fee per litter
  • Mom Cat and Nursing Kittens: $50 fee
  • Litter of Weaned Kittens: $25 fee

OUT OF COUNTY SURRENDER POLICY

A $50 fee will apply to each animal brought to a Humane Pennsylvania shelter from a county other than the one in which it was found. For example, a $50 fee would be applied to an animal brought to the Humane League of Lancaster County from Berks County.

LOST & FOUND PETS

To report a lost or found pet, submit the information online by clicking here, or call the Humane Society of Berks County at 610-921-2348 or the Humane League of Lancaster County at 717-393-6551.

DOG LICENSING

Your pet is your responsibility!  License your dog now.  It’s the law and it may save your pet’s life.

View information and download Pennsylvania dog license applications.

FERAL & FREE ROAMING CAT ISSUES

What are feral cats?

Feral cats are not socialized to people. While they are socialized to their colony members and bonded to each other, they do not have that same relationship with people.

Why feral cats are not meant to be in shelters:

Feral cats are under socialized and not able to be handled. A feral cat is an adult cat who has either never had any contact with humans or their contact with humans has diminished over time. They are fearful of people and survives on their own outdoors. A feral cat is not likely to ever become a lap cat or enjoy living indoors. Unfortunately, feral cats do not allow themselves to be handled and are very limited to re-homing options. As result, feral cats are likely to be euthanized if picked up by animal control or brought to shelters. Therefore, it is in the cat’s best interest to continue to live outdoors.

What are free roaming cats?

Free roaming cats may be feral cats, but they are often semi- of fully-socialized cats which live predominantly or exclusively outdoors.  Often a cat may be cared for by multiple families in a neighborhood.  While free roaming cats are not “house cats” in the traditional sense, they are not exactly “lost” strays either.  Taking them to a shelter is often removing them from an established local caregiver or network of caregivers.

Why feral and free roaming cats are not meant to be in shelters:

Feral cats are under socialized and not able to be easily handled. A feral cat is an adult cat who has either never had any contact with humans or their contact with humans has diminished over time. They are fearful of people and survives on their own outdoors. A feral cat is not likely to ever become a lap cat or enjoy living indoors. Unfortunately, because feral cats do not allow themselves to be handled, they face very limited to re-homing options. As result, feral cats are likely to be euthanized if picked up by animal control or brought to shelters. Therefore, it is in the cat’s best interest to continue to live outdoors.

Humane Pennsylvania strongly encourages all cats to be indoor cats, but we know that this is not always possible.  Free roaming cats are often fully socialized but they do not always transition well to being house cats. They also may not acclimate well to shelters and may pose a safety risk in shelters, leading to an increased likelihood of euthanasia.  While not ideal, free roaming cats can and do lead long, happy, and healthy lives outside of a traditional home setting.

However, both feral and free roaming cats should be sterilized, vaccinated, and micro-chipped for their safety (and the community’s), and should be provided with secure, warm shelter and food.  Humane Pennsylvania offers extensive Feral & Free Roaming Cat Solutions and a wide variety supports for those interested in supporting their community’s feral and free roaming cats.

For more information about Humane Pennsylvania’s Feral & Free Roaming Cat Solutions program, click here. 

Additional Lancaster County Resources:

Helping Hands for Animals

Additional Berks County Resources: 

No Nonsense Neutering

Alley Cat Allies is another great resource!